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How successful has the 2018 box office been? Let us count the ways.

The movie business is on track to hit a global record, and for the first time in a while, North America is to thank. After being diagnosed with severe cases of sequelitis and franchise fatigue, studios were able to lure audiences back to theaters with a healthy mix of worthy blockbusters and surprise successes that will likely spawn sequels of their own.

Here, Variety broke down some key box office stats that helped ignite a record year.

$11.9 billion — Total revenue in North America

The domestic box office set a new benchmark this year and is expected to cross $11.9 billion for the first time ever. The massive boost — up 7% from last year — is due in part to blockbusters like Disney’s “Avengers: Infinity War,” Universal’s “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom,” and Fox’s “Deadpool 2,” as well as sleeper hits like Paramount’s “A Quiet Place” and Warner Bros.’ “A Star Is Born.” There were some notable flops, to be sure, but overall it’s been a good year for Hollywood. 2019 has a lot to live up to.

$700 million — Highest grossing movie of the year

“Black Panther” was the big winner in North America, becoming one of three movies to ever hit $700 million at the domestic box office and the third-highest grossing film of all time in the States. The barrier-breaking film became the must-see cultural event at theaters, driving its global haul past $1.3 billion. Is Oscar gold the next stop on Marvel’s road to glory?

64.4% — Percentage of moviegoers between the ages of 18 and 44

Read: Young people are still going to the movies. Netflix has the convenience factor, sure, but millennials are still willing to shell out for the right theatrical experience — so much so that moviegoers between 18 and 44 years old accounted for more than half of audiences.

$9.38 — Average ticket price in the country

Going to the movies got more expensive this year. The average ticket price in North America rose to $9.38 over the summer, increasing 43 cents from the year prior. That figure is collected from national prices across the country, which are typically less expensive in rural states. If you live in New York City or Los Angeles, however, a ticket under $10 sounds like a steal!

4 — Months that set new records

Hollywood took a risk or two this year, and it paid off in a big way. Like any other year, this summer had its share of juggernauts. But rather than relying on summer vacation or the Thanksgiving-New Year’s stretch to drop a blockbuster hopeful, studios were able to avoid cannibalization by looking beyond traditional money-making months to release big movies. That, in turn, fueled four record-breaking months: February (“Black Panther”), April (“Avengers: Infinity War” and “A Quiet Place”), June (“Incredibles 2” and “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom), and October (“Venom” and “A Star Is Born). It never hurts to spread the wealth.

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